Tips for Keeping Your Mouth Fresh by Cleaning Your Dentures Properly

If your dentures aren’t clean, neither is your mouth, and if your mouth isn’t clean, your breath will be off-putting to your friends, colleagues and family. Caring for your dentures properly can mean the difference between people wanting to get close to you and people giving you a wide berth.

Follow these simple tips to ensure that your oral hygiene is passing the important tests.

Clean your dentures properly each night. Dentures come out each night to let your gum tissue rest. Holding dentures all day is hard work, and your gums need a chance to relax. Overnight, the blood supply to the gums is restored, allowing a recuperation that protects bone and also the fit of your dentures. This time outside of your mouth is the perfect time for dentures to be cleaned thoroughly and properly.

Brush and rinse your full or partial dentures just as you would your natural teeth. Plaque can build up and food particles can begin to decay, causing bacteria and odor. This regular brushing can also prevent the development of permanent stains and discoloration over time. Clean each surface of the appliance gently and thoroughly, from the teeth to acrylic gum portion. Hard bristle brushes or aggressive brushing can damage your dentures.

Only use tools or cleaners that are specifically designed and recommended for dentures. If you are in search of a product, ask your dentist for a recommendation. Many toothpastes contain abrasive ingredients that can damage your dentures. Never use bleach; it can discolor the pink portion of your full or partial dentures.

Be sure to store your dentures properly in a denture cleansing soaking solution or in water. They will distort and dry out if left outside of your mouth or some other moisture. Never put your denture into hot liquids or they might become extremely misshapen.

Follow these tips for keeping your dentures looking – and smelling – their best!   Talk to your dentist if you have additional questions.  If you live in the Shreveport LA area and you need dentures, contact our office today.

Dentist Shreveport LA

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Introducing Children to a Family Dentist

Dentists recommend seeing children for the first time when they have begun to cut teeth, by the time they have celebrated a first birthday. A first visit is primarily about allowing a child to get comfortable in the dentist’s chair and about educating you, the parent, on how to care for your child’s baby teeth. Most children who visit at this age will not remember the visit, but it will lay the foundation for positive experiences in the dental chair in the future.

Once children reach the approximate age of 5, they will have their first set of X-rays taken. The family dentist will review them to look for cavities between the teeth and to check proper development of dormant permanent teeth.

As children age, between 6 and 12 years, they will lose their baby teeth and permanent teeth will begin to erupt. At this time, your family dentist may recommend a tooth sealant. This plastic resin bonds to the “flat” chewing surface of a tooth, protecting it from debris and decay in the crevices.

Your family dentist may also give your child an orthodontic evaluation. Most pediatric patients begin orthodontics once all of their permanent teeth have erupted; however, some patients benefit from staged orthodontics and can begin treatment much sooner.

If your child has been seeing a dentist since infancy, introducing the child to the dentist isn’t an issue; your child already knows and trusts your family dentist. If you are bringing your child to the dentist for the first time as a toddler or kindergarten student, you should plan to spend some time talking about what to expect.

Many times, having parents sit in the dental chair and then hold their child on their laps is very comforting to the patient. Your family dentist has experience in dealing with fearful or anxious children and will know what to do in each case. Often, videos or music are employed to relax young patients.

You can trust your family dentist with each member of your family, no matter what the age. Talk to your family dentist today with any questions you may have about your child’s first dental appointment.

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